Home Cured Bacon

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My first foray into charcuterie was a success. Curing blend adapted from Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing. It is made from a blend of salt, sugar and pink salt (sodium nitrate). Make sure to buy real pink salt and not the bull shit Himilayan pink salt, it is not made with sodium nitrate.  Unfortunately, quite a few recipes require both a smoker and also specialty ingredients (e.g. juniper berries).

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Rib Eye Roast

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Seven hour convection roast @ 150 degrees Fahrenheit.  Adapted from this.  Rib roasts are easy, kosher salt and pepper rub.  Then, stick in the oven, low and slow.  Let the roast sit for at least a half hour and then finish it off for at least five minutes at 525 degrees Fahrenheit before serving.

Best Buttermilk Pancakes

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Adapted from this.  The crux of this recipe is buttermilk.  It is difficult to find legit buttermilk, however there is a dairy farm near where I live.

Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl:

2 cups flour
2 tbsp sugar
4 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp fine salt

Combine the wet ingredients in a second bowl:

2 cups buttermilk
4 tbsp melted butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 beaten eggs

Smoked Baby Back Ribs

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Ahh, the intricacies of BBQ.  I started these baby back ribs out in my new smoker for a few hours.  Then in the oven to finish them off.  They are Kansas City style, with a tomato based sauce.  The sauce is a derivative if this recipe.  I kinda winged the smoking and roasting process.  I put the ribs in the smoker for two hours: the smoker did not get very hot and the ribs were still raw-ish.  Then, I put the ribs in a 315 degree oven for 40 minutes.  After, I put on the BBQ sauce and cranked up the temperature to 400 degrees for 15 minutes.  I think 15 minutes was too long, going for around 7 minutes next time/

5 Gallons of Bavarian Hefeweizen

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This is my first attempt at brewing beer.  I was extremely careful about the sanitation stuff in order to not contaminate my batch.  I am curious as to how cooling the wort after the boil effects the batch.  It takes around an hour to cool wort in an ice bath to an acceptable temperature to add yeast… so I am thinking about investing in a wort chiller for my next recipe.  It is going to be interesting to see how the yeast interacts with the hops and barely.  Looking forward to tasting it.

Potato Gnocchi

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Ok, so these came are really well thanks to my new potato ricer.  I sort of combined to gnocchi recipes, here and here.  I baked the potatoes instead of boiling them.  Also, 5 pounds of potatoes in too many for one sitting.  I have been experimenting with a new sauce which includes carrots, onion and red peppers finely chopped in a food processor and then somewhat caramelized in a pot before adding the tomatoes.